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Melatonin Skin Patch | Ageforce.com

Sleeping Patch, Natural Sleep Aids, GABA for Sleep, GABA Sleep Aid, Cures for Insomnia

Melatonin – Incredible Benefits In Addition To Quality Sleep

MelatoninMelatonin, or N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, as some scientists would say, is not just one out of several, it is the circadian hormone, per se. Being produced in the pineal gland, melatonin has been shown to reset, regulate and synchronize the internal clock of our bodies (Arendt. 1987).

In the late evening, when the sun sets and the production of melatonin is no longer suppressed by the light-induced negative feedback on the pineal gland, your natural melatonin production kicks in.

Unfortunately, next to artificial light, which is something you can easily avoid by wearing a blindfold in bed, aging (Karasek. 2004) and metabolic diseases incl. obesity (Reiter. 2012) will also inhibit the increase in serum melatonin in the hours before you go to bed.

Melatonin Supplements Are A Potential Fountain Of Youth

Studies have shown that the natural melatonin production starts to decline by the age of 30 – and that at a pace pretty rapid pace of approximately 2% per year (Sack. 1986). This decline in melatonin, which is still falsely considered to be a simple "sleep hormone" by many medical practitioners, goes hand in hand with a decline in antioxidant defenses. The same decline, of which researchers believe that it is at the heart of the anatomical and functional degeneration organs undergo during when we age. Accoringly, Reiter is spot on, when he points out in a 1994 paper in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis that the age-induced decline in melatonin production "may well play a significant role in aging processes," and that its prevention (e.g. by supplementation) "could be prevented" or at least "[delay] the aging process" (Reiter. 1994).

The scientist from the University of Texas in San Antonio also believes that supplemental administration of melatonin may be beneficial in delaying age-related degenerative conditions, particularly in view of the fact that free radical damage has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, which may be forestalled by chronic melatonin administration.

Melatonin and the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases

More recently, scientists from the Netherlands Institute for Brain Research supplied further evidence that Reiter's 20-year old hypothesis may actually be true (Wu. 2005). In their paper in the Journal of Pineal Research, Ying-Hui Wu and Dick F. Swaab report that they were able to show that the disruption of melatonin production is a characteristic feature of Alzheimer's that can be observed "as early as in the very first preclinical stages" (Wu. 2005) of this debilitating neurological disease. It is thus not surprising that early rodent data suggests that melatonin supplementation can reduce or even prevent both, the normal and pathological aging process of the brain and could thus help you to avoid a whole host of neurological problems we see in the elderly, today (Ramírez-Rodríguez. 2012; Peng. 2013). Many of these hypothetical benefits have already been confirmed for Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Polimeni. 2013).

Melatonin as a Zeitgeber and antioxidant

Whether the benefits are a mere result of the powerful antioxidant capacity of melatonin, of which scientists from the Atatürk University have shown that it they are 10x more pronounced than those of vitamin E (see Figure 1), is something researchers are still debating.


Percentage inhibition of lipid peroxidation
Figure 1: Percentage inhibition of lipid peroxidation by melatonin and
alpha-tocopherol in a linoleic acid emulsion as a marker of the potent
anti-oxidant activity of melatonin (Gulcin. 2002)

melatoninWhat stands out of questions, though, is the fact that at least part of the benefits of melatonin are mediated by its ability to synchronize and reset the central (brain) and peripheral (liver, muscle, fat, etc.) clocks of your body.

This is an important effect, since the loss of synchronicity of central and peripheral clocks has been associated with the whole spectrum of diseases of civilization ranging from "C" as in cancer to "O" as in obesity, almost all of the contemporarily increasing ailments is in one way or another related to the lack of synchronicity of the central and peripheral clocks in our brain and organs tissue.

No wonder, shift work, and even the chronic exposure to bright (specifically blue) light at night have been consistently linked to increased obesity and cancer risks in men and women (Hansen. 2002; Kubo. 2006; Viswanathan. 2007; Antunes. 2010).

The anti-obesity, pro-metabolic effects of melatonin supplements

Rodent studies show that the provision of melatonin supplements can realign the peripheral and central clock and prevent mammals from the negative side effects (Prunet-Marcassus. 2003). In their 2012 review of the literature, F. Nduhirabandi, E. F. du Toit and A. Lochner list 24 experimentally verified metabolic benefits of melatonin supplementation (see Figure 2 ).

Obesity related health parameters improved with melatoning
Figure 2: Obesity related health parameters that may improve with melatonin treatment
(Nduhirabandi. 2012)

In view of the fact that melatonin has also been implicated as a regulator and controller of brown, i.e. fat burning adipose tissue mass and activity, it is obvious that the pineal hormone is already touted as the most promising "naturally occurring substance with no reported toxicity" that "may serve as a novel approach for treatment of obesity" (Tan. 2011) by researchers all around the world (Bonnefont-Rousselot. 2014; Cipolla ‐ Neto. 2014).

summary of melatonin

Figure 3: Summary of metabolic and chronobiological actions of melatonin resulting in the regulation of energy metabolism, energy
balance, and ultimately body weight (left); and consequences of the absence or reduction in melatonin production (right; cf. Cipolla-Neto. 2004).

As Cipolla-Neto et al. explain in their review of the negative effects of a lack of melatonin, even the scope of the already known ill health effects is huge (see Figure 3 , right). The same can be said of the health benefits that may be achieved by its specific and well-timed supplementation:

  • Energy homeostasis   --  prevent weight gain, promote fat loss

  • Insulin action   --  increase insulin sensitivity

  • Glucose and lipid control   --  reduce risk of dyslipidemia & type II diabetes

  • Liver function   --  reduced risk of NAFLD and related diseases

  • Adipose tissue function   --  reduced body fat storage and increased fat loss

  • Skeletal muscle function   -- faster recovery, higher performance & glucose uptake

While all of the previously listed benefits have been observed in rodent studies, the unwarranted fear that the use of melatonin supplements could have negative side effects, let alone shut down the natural melatonin production permanently is to blame that corresponding human trials are rare.

General antioxidant activity - Polish scientists found that the provision of 5mg of melatonin approximately 1h before bed for 30 days normalized the age-related decrease in erythrocyte anti-oxidant status and may thus "prolong the lifespan and improve the quality of life of elderly people." (Kędziora ‐ Kornatowska. 2007). Similar beneficial anti-oxidant effects have been observed by the same researchers in hypertensive subjects and type II diabetics, as well (Kędziora ‐ Kornatowska. 2008; Kędziora ‐ Kornatowska. 2009).

Blood pressure control - In 1998, already, Cagnacci et al. reported significant improvements in artery blood flow, decreased blood pressure, and a reduces stress response in young, healthy women in response to the administration of 1 mg of melatonin. Similar effects have subsequently been reported by Arangio et al. (1999) in young men. More recently, scientists from the Netherlands Institute for Brain Research have been able to show similar benefits in response to chronic supplementation with 2.5mg of melatonin before bed. The supplementation regimen reduced the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in hypertensive men during sleep by 6 and 4 mm Hg, respectively (Scheer. 2004). Similar results have been reported by Ray et al. (2003) who observed that melatonin attenuates the sympathetic nerve responses to orthostatic stress in humans.

Cancer prevention and treatment - Blask et al. observed a rise in markers of tumor suppression in a human volunteer in response to a commercial 3mg preparation of melatonin (Blask. 2005).

Metabolic syndrome - Koziróg et al. (2011) report that comparatively small doses of 5mg/day (rodent studies often use 10mg or more) melatonin improve blood pressure, lipid profile, and parameters of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome.

Along with other studies, the previously cited experimental evidence has long convinced our the AgeForce R&D team of the great health benefits of melatonin supplements, which may be significantly augmented by the time-released delivery of melatonin through the skin.

References:

Antunes, L. C., et al. "Obesity and shift work: chronobiological aspects." Nutrition research reviews 23.01 (2010): 155-168.)

Arangino, Serenella, et al. "Effects of melatonin on vascular reactivity, catecholamine levels, and blood pressure in healthy men." The American journal of cardiology 83.9 (1999): 1417-1419.

Arendt, Josephine, and James Broadway. "Light and melatonin as zeitgebers in man." Chronobiology international 4.2 (1987): 273-282.

Blask, David E., et al. "Oral melatonin supplementation in rats and a human subject suppresses the growth activity of steroid receptor negative human breast cancer xenografts in female nude rats via an MT1 receptor-mediated suppression of signal tranduction and linoleic acid uptake and metabolism." Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research 2005.1 (2005): 1358.

Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique. "Obesity and Oxidative Stress: Potential Roles of Melatonin as Antioxidant and Metabolic Regulator." Endocrine, metabolic & immune disorders drug targets (2014).

Bray, M. S., and M. E. Young. "Circadian rhythms in the development of obesity: potential role for the circadian clock within the adipocyte." obesity reviews 8.2 (2007): 169-181.

Cagnacci, Angelo, et al. "Influences of melatonin administration on the circulation of women." American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology 274.2 (1998): R335-R338.

Cagnacci, Angelo, et al. "Influence of melatonin administration on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity of postmenopausal women." Clinical endocrinology 54.3 (2001): 339-346.

Cipolla ‐ Neto, J., et al. "Melatonin, energy metabolism, and obesity: a review." Journal of pineal research 56.4 (2014): 371-381.

Hansen, Johnni. "Increased breast cancer risk among women who work predominantly at night." Epidemiology 12.1 (2001): 74-77.

Karasek, M. "Melatonin, human aging, and age-related diseases." Experimental gerontology 39.11 (2004): 1723-1729.

Kędziora‐Kornatowska, Kornelia, et al. "Effect of melatonin on the oxidative stress in erythrocytes of healthy young and elderly subjects*." Journal of pineal research 42.2 (2007): 153-158.

Kędziora‐Kornatowska, Kornelia, et al. "Antioxidative effects of melatonin administration in elderly primary essential hypertension patients." Journal of pineal research 45.3 (2008): 312-317.

Kędziora‐Kornatowska, Kornelia, et al. "Melatonin improves oxidative stress parameters measured in the blood of elderly type 2 diabetic patients." Journal of pineal research 46.3 (2009): 333-337.

Koziróg, Marzena, et al. "Melatonin treatment improves blood pressure, lipid profile, and parameters of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome." Journal of pineal research 50.3 (2011): 261-266.

Kubo, Tatsuhiko, et al. "Prospective cohort study of the risk of prostate cancer among rotating-shift workers: findings from the Japan collaborative cohort study." American Journal of Epidemiology 164.6 (2006): 549-555.

Nduhirabandi, Frederic, Eugene F. du Toit, and Amanda Lochner. "Melatonin and the metabolic syndrome: a tool for effective therapy in obesity ‐ associated abnormalities?." Acta physiologica 205.2 (2012): 209-223.

Peng, Cai-Xia, et al. "Disease-modified glycogen synthase kinase-3β intervention by melatonin arrests the pathology and memory deficits in an Alzheimer's animal model." Neurobiology of aging 34.6 (2013): 1555-1563.

Polimeni, Giovanni, et al. "Role of melatonin supplementation in neurodegenerative disorders." Frontiers in bioscience (Landmark edition) 19 (2013): 429-446.

Prunet-Marcassus, Benedicte, et al. "Melatonin reduces body weight gain in Sprague Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity." Endocrinology 144.12 (2003): 5347-5352.

Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gerardo, et al. "Melatonin supplementation delays the decline of adult hippocampal neurogenesis during normal aging of mice." Neuroscience letters 530.1 (2012): 53-58.

Ray, Chester A. "Melatonin attenuates the sympathetic nerve responses to orthostatic stress in humans." The Journal of physiology 551.3 (2003): 1043-1048.

Reiter, Russel J., et al. "Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression." Annals of medicine 44.6 (2012): 564-577.

Sack, Robert L., et al. "Human melatonin production decreases with age." Journal of pineal research 3.4 (1986): 379-388.

Tan, D ‐ X., et al. "Significance and application of melatonin in the regulation of brown adipose tissue metabolism: relation to human obesity." Obesity Reviews 12.3 (2011): 167-188.

Terzolo, Massimo, et al. "Effects of Long ‐ Term, Low ‐ Dose, Time ‐ Specified Melatonin Administration on Endocrine and Cardiovascular Variables in Adult Men." Journal of pineal research 9.2 (1990): 113-124.

Viswanathan, Akila N., Susan E. Hankinson, and Eva S. Schernhammer. "Night shift work and the risk of endometrial cancer." Cancer Research 67.21 (2007): 10618-10622.

Wu, Ying ‐ Hui, and Dick F. Swaab. "The human pineal gland and melatonin in aging and Alzheimer's disease." Journal of pineal research 38.3 (2005): 145-152.

Yilmaz, Bayram, et al. "Melatonin inhibits testosterone secretion by acting at hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in the rat." Neuro endocrinology letters 21.4 (2000): 301.

Customer Reviews - We do not monitor or control the content of reviews but reserve the right to remove what are, in our sole opinion, clearly false statements, spam or other injurious materials that are brought to our attention. We do not adopt or endorse any review statement.
4.8/5 from 11 ratings.
Summary rating
Melatonin patch way better than pills
Review
I like to use this melatonin patch at the same time as the Mag Direct patch, since magnesium is an aid to sleep as well. Taking melatonin through your skin rather than through the digestive system is a much faster way to get results each night. I do make a point of removing the melatonin patch after 8 hours or else I stay groggy in the morning when I should be getting up.
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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful
Melatonin
Review
These DEFINITELY work...they actually work TOO well. I think 5 mg is a lil too much for every day use. Left me feeling groggy 24/7 after 30 days of nightly use. I suggest blood testing before supplementing to get the beat dosage for your individual needs
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great sleep!
Review
This patch really helps me sleep better at night!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Keeps getting better!
Review
I left a comment over a year ago and the results keep getting better! The sleep is still amazing without feeling tired the next morning. The consistent use of this patch has allowed me to remove an anxiety/sleep medication from my life. My wife has been using it in the same manner with the same results. We couldn't be happier with this patch and the fact I was able to stop taking a poisonous pharmaceutical is a great bonus! Better than any melatonin pill I have ever used! A+
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Wonderful !!!!
Review
I have been directed by many Drs to try melatonin but all oral ones gave me a stomach ache.
This patch has been a Godsend as it delivers it direct into the bloodstream.
I put it on about 1 hour before bed. It does help me sleep better!
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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful
Melatonin.4.deep.sleep!
Review
Have used melatonin for YEARS and it is a great help with calming and settling me down for a much needed good night sleep Smile
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Works great
Review
These patches help you ease into sleep and doesn't leave you with a drugged groggy feeling. Since good sleep is essential to maintaining good health I highly recommend, even if you think you are getting decent sleep you will find with these patches the quality of your sleep is much better.
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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful
Sleep like a baby
Review
I have used many Melatonin products in the past but none works as well as these patches.  I found out the hard way when I ran out for a couple of days.  I fall asleep easily and stay asleep longer, plus so easy to use!  Keep them by my bed and put one on each night and sleep like a baby!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
dreams a plenty
Review
This patch works, it sets a deep sleep cycle when used as instructed. My only mistake was to leave it on and went to work and half way during the morning I was yawning and feeling very calm, I remembered the patch and took it off and  in a short amount of time with coffee was back to normal.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Melatonin Patches
Review
My wife and myself have been using the Melatonin patches for several years now and they provide and restful and dream filled night's rest.  We both have experienced no signs of grogginess the next morning and we both highly recommend these phenomenal patches!
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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful

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References:

Antunes, L. C., et al. "Obesity and shift work: chronobiological aspects." Nutrition research reviews 23.01 (2010): 155-168.)

Arangino, Serenella, et al. "Effects of melatonin on vascular reactivity, catecholamine levels, and blood pressure in healthy men." The American journal of cardiology 83.9 (1999): 1417-1419.

Arendt, Josephine, and James Broadway. "Light and melatonin as zeitgebers in man." Chronobiology international 4.2 (1987): 273-282.

Blask, David E., et al. "Oral melatonin supplementation in rats and a human subject suppresses the growth activity of steroid receptor negative human breast cancer xenografts in female nude rats via an MT1 receptor-mediated suppression of signal tranduction and linoleic acid uptake and metabolism." Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research 2005.1 (2005): 1358.

Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique. "Obesity and Oxidative Stress: Potential Roles of Melatonin as Antioxidant and Metabolic Regulator." Endocrine, metabolic & immune disorders drug targets (2014).

Bray, M. S., and M. E. Young. "Circadian rhythms in the development of obesity: potential role for the circadian clock within the adipocyte." obesity reviews 8.2 (2007): 169-181.

Cagnacci, Angelo, et al. "Influences of melatonin administration on the circulation of women." American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology 274.2 (1998): R335-R338.

Cagnacci, Angelo, et al. "Influence of melatonin administration on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity of postmenopausal women." Clinical endocrinology 54.3 (2001): 339-346.

CipollaNeto, J., et al. "Melatonin, energy metabolism, and obesity: a review." Journal of pineal research 56.4 (2014): 371-381.

Hansen, Johnni. "Increased breast cancer risk among women who work predominantly at night." Epidemiology 12.1 (2001): 74-77.

Karasek, M. "Melatonin, human aging, and age-related diseases." Experimental gerontology 39.11 (2004): 1723-1729.

Kędziora‐Kornatowska, Kornelia, et al. "Effect of melatonin on the oxidative stress in erythrocytes of healthy young and elderly subjects*." Journal of pineal research 42.2 (2007): 153-158.

Kędziora‐Kornatowska, Kornelia, et al. "Antioxidative effects of melatonin administration in elderly primary essential hypertension patients." Journal of pineal research 45.3 (2008): 312-317.

Kędziora‐Kornatowska, Kornelia, et al. "Melatonin improves oxidative stress parameters measured in the blood of elderly type 2 diabetic patients." Journal of pineal research 46.3 (2009): 333-337.

Koziróg, Marzena, et al. "Melatonin treatment improves blood pressure, lipid profile, and parameters of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome." Journal of pineal research 50.3 (2011): 261-266.

Kubo, Tatsuhiko, et al. "Prospective cohort study of the risk of prostate cancer among rotating-shift workers: findings from the Japan collaborative cohort study." American Journal of Epidemiology 164.6 (2006): 549-555.

Nduhirabandi, Frederic, Eugene F. du Toit, and Amanda Lochner. "Melatonin and the metabolic syndrome: a tool for effective therapy in obesityassociated abnormalities?." Acta physiologica 205.2 (2012): 209-223.

Peng, Cai-Xia, et al. "Disease-modified glycogen synthase kinase-3β intervention by melatonin arrests the pathology and memory deficits in an Alzheimer's animal model." Neurobiology of aging 34.6 (2013): 1555-1563.

Polimeni, Giovanni, et al. "Role of melatonin supplementation in neurodegenerative disorders." Frontiers in bioscience (Landmark edition) 19 (2013): 429-446.

Prunet-Marcassus, Benedicte, et al. "Melatonin reduces body weight gain in Sprague Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity." Endocrinology 144.12 (2003): 5347-5352.

Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gerardo, et al. "Melatonin supplementation delays the decline of adult hippocampal neurogenesis during normal aging of mice." Neuroscience letters 530.1 (2012): 53-58.

Ray, Chester A. "Melatonin attenuates the sympathetic nerve responses to orthostatic stress in humans." The Journal of physiology 551.3 (2003): 1043-1048.

Reiter, Russel J., et al. "Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression." Annals of medicine 44.6 (2012): 564-577.

Sack, Robert L., et al. "Human melatonin production decreases with age." Journal of pineal research 3.4 (1986): 379-388.

Tan, DX., et al. "Significance and application of melatonin in the regulation of brown adipose tissue metabolism: relation to human obesity." Obesity Reviews 12.3 (2011): 167-188.

Terzolo, Massimo, et al. "Effects of LongTerm, LowDose, TimeSpecified Melatonin Administration on Endocrine and Cardiovascular Variables in Adult Men." Journal of pineal research 9.2 (1990): 113-124.

Viswanathan, Akila N., Susan E. Hankinson, and Eva S. Schernhammer. "Night shift work and the risk of endometrial cancer." Cancer Research 67.21 (2007): 10618-10622.

Wu, YingHui, and Dick F. Swaab. "The human pineal gland and melatonin in aging and Alzheimer's disease." Journal of pineal research 38.3 (2005): 145-152.

Yilmaz, Bayram, et al. "Melatonin inhibits testosterone secretion by acting at hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in the rat." Neuro endocrinology letters 21.4 (2000): 301.

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